BioPHILe
The pathetic blog of a college student who knows only that she knows nothing. Click "ENTER THE NOUMENA" or scroll down in order to descend into the crevasse.

April 19 2014, 07:40 PM

5 notes  Filed Under:  me  cats  siamese  

every picture i see of a seal point siamese cat just makes me

April 19 2014, 07:38 PM

158 notes   •  VIA: railroadsoftware   •   SOURCE: cat-pic
Filed Under:  cats  
cat-pic:

ぎゃわぇえお ぎゅー。離したくないのー。 http://nekopple.com

cat-pic:

ぎゃわぇえお ぎゅー。離したくないのー。 http://nekopple.com

April 19 2014, 07:05 PM

13 notes  Filed Under:  me  me and this weird-ass blog  

i’m amazed and a bit concerned about the number of followers i have and the fact that they are being exposed to all of the shit content on my blog like there is some messed up shit there and then there is science and philosophy and me being a whining bitch and things that i shouldn’t find funny but i do due to the bizarre humor i have somehow developed through interactions on weird twitter and tumblr. like did mmost of you guys find me through that kitten video that i posted that somehow went fucking viral on this damn website (which is not even my video; that’s not my cat. i was just watching cute siamese cat videos on youtube because i missed my cat)? or that scooby doo/GOP candidate post that people are takingn too seriously? or just the numerous netflix screencaps i’ve posted because i’m pathetic when it comes to generating original content? i just hope u guys are doing alright and are in good health

April 19 2014, 07:01 PM

  • eyes: nine celebrity crushes.
  • ears: eight favorite songs.
  • nose: seven favorite scents.
  • mouth: six favorite quotes.
  • heart: five people you love in this or any other world.
  • hands: four things you've created that you're proud of.
  • stomach: three comfort foods.
  • knees: two things that make you go weak in the knees.
  • feet: one thing you want to accomplish in life.

April 19 2014, 06:51 PM

81 notes   •  VIA: fightingforanimals   •   SOURCE: birdsonly
Filed Under:  birds  marabou stork  biology  
birdsonly:

Marabou Stork ~ Marabu ~ Leptoptilos crumeniferus
2014 © Jesse Alveo

birdsonly:

Marabou Stork ~ Marabu ~ Leptoptilos crumeniferus

2014 © Jesse Alveo

April 19 2014, 06:51 PM

metalsette:

there’s a rip off of bee movie called plan bee and this is what the characters look like and I am no longer afraid to die

metalsette:

there’s a rip off of bee movie called plan bee and this is what the characters look like and I am no longer afraid to die

April 19 2014, 06:50 PM

neuromorphogenesis:

Canadian student has “out of body experiences” whenever she wants
After attending a lecture on “out of body experiences,” a 24-year-old student from the University of Ottawa approached her professor saying, “I thought everybody could do that.” She can apparently do this at will — making her the first person with this condition to be studied.
The resulting paper, which now appears in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, describes the condition as something of an illusion, where a person’s ability to track their body’s position in space and time has somehow become externalized. In this extraordinary case, the university student claims she can do this whenever she wants — to induce the feeling that she can experience her body moving outside the boundaries of her physical body, while remaining aware of her unmoving physical body.
So, if you’re a neuroscientist studying this particular person, what do you do? You put her in a brain scanner, of course. Writing in ABC News, Gillian Mohney explains more:

[Claude] Messier and his co-author interviewed the student and had her undergo an MRI to see if her brain activity might shed light on her unusual ability.
Messier said the girl first noticed her ability when she was a child and had a hard time going to sleep during naps. To pass the time she would “float” above her body.
"I feel myself moving, or, more accurately, can make myself feel as if I am moving. I know perfectly well that I am not actually moving," the student told the researchers. "In fact, I am hyper-sensitive to my body at that point, because I am concentrating so hard on the sensation of moving…For example, if I ‘spin’ for long enough, I get dizzy."
Messier said at some point the student’s brain showed similar activity to that of a high-level athlete who can vividly imagine themselves winning a competition. One difference, however, was that her brain activity was focused on one side, and the athletes usually show activity on both brain hemispheres.
Messier said more study was needed, but he said that this discovery could mean many more people have this ability but find it “unremarkable.” The discovery could be similar to how synesthesia, a mix of multiple senses, was discovered in a wider population.
Alternately, the ability could be something that everyone is able to do as an infant or child, but lose as they get older.

Wild stuff. Typically, this condition happens as the result of an injury, psychological illness, lesions on the brain, or from a drug that induces the illusion. The researchers speculate that this ability might be present in infancy but that it’s lost without regular practice. They also hypothesize that it’s more prevalent in young people… and that it’s a skill that might be developed.

neuromorphogenesis:

Canadian student has “out of body experiences” whenever she wants

After attending a lecture on “out of body experiences,” a 24-year-old student from the University of Ottawa approached her professor saying, “I thought everybody could do that.” She can apparently do this at will — making her the first person with this condition to be studied.

The resulting paper, which now appears in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, describes the condition as something of an illusion, where a person’s ability to track their body’s position in space and time has somehow become externalized. In this extraordinary case, the university student claims she can do this whenever she wants — to induce the feeling that she can experience her body moving outside the boundaries of her physical body, while remaining aware of her unmoving physical body.

So, if you’re a neuroscientist studying this particular person, what do you do? You put her in a brain scanner, of course. Writing in ABC News, Gillian Mohney explains more:

[Claude] Messier and his co-author interviewed the student and had her undergo an MRI to see if her brain activity might shed light on her unusual ability.

Messier said the girl first noticed her ability when she was a child and had a hard time going to sleep during naps. To pass the time she would “float” above her body.

"I feel myself moving, or, more accurately, can make myself feel as if I am moving. I know perfectly well that I am not actually moving," the student told the researchers. "In fact, I am hyper-sensitive to my body at that point, because I am concentrating so hard on the sensation of moving…For example, if I ‘spin’ for long enough, I get dizzy."

Messier said at some point the student’s brain showed similar activity to that of a high-level athlete who can vividly imagine themselves winning a competition. One difference, however, was that her brain activity was focused on one side, and the athletes usually show activity on both brain hemispheres.

Messier said more study was needed, but he said that this discovery could mean many more people have this ability but find it “unremarkable.” The discovery could be similar to how synesthesia, a mix of multiple senses, was discovered in a wider population.

Alternately, the ability could be something that everyone is able to do as an infant or child, but lose as they get older.

Wild stuff. Typically, this condition happens as the result of an injury, psychological illness, lesions on the brain, or from a drug that induces the illusion. The researchers speculate that this ability might be present in infancy but that it’s lost without regular practice. They also hypothesize that it’s more prevalent in young people… and that it’s a skill that might be developed.